School Help: A Teacher and Tutor Guide to Help the Older Student with Limited Word Reading Fluency


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Developing Phonics Knowledge and Reading Accuracy/Decoding Skills

By listening to good models of fluent reading, students learn how a reader's voice can help written text make sense. Read aloud daily to your students. By reading effortlessly and with expression, you are modeling for your students how a fluent reader sounds during reading.

Dyslexia and Poor Readers

After you model how to read the text, you must have the students reread it. By doing this, the students are engaging in repeated reading. Usually, having students read a text four times is sufficient to improve fluency. Remember, however, that instructional time is limited, and it is the actual time that students are actively engaged in reading that produces reading gains.

Have other adults read aloud to students. Encourage parents or other family members to read aloud to their children at home. The more models of fluent reading the children hear, the better. Of course, hearing a model of fluent reading is not the only benefit of reading aloud to children. Reading to children also increases their knowledge of the world, their vocabulary, their familiarity with written language "book language" , and their interest in reading.

There are several ways that your students can practice orally rereading text, including student-adult reading, choral or unison reading, tape-assisted reading, partner reading, and readers' theatre. In student-adult reading, the student reads one-on-one with an adult. The adult can be you, a parent, a classroom aide, or a tutor. The adult reads the text first, providing the students with a model of fluent reading. Then the student reads the same passage to the adult with the adult providing assistance and encouragement. The student rereads the passage until the reading is quite fluent.

This should take approximately three to four rereadings. In choral, or unison, reading, students read along as a group with you or another fluent adult reader. Of course, to do so, students must be able to see the same text that you are reading. They might follow along as you read from a big book, or they might read from their own copy of the book you are reading. For choral reading, choose a book that is not too long and that you think is at the independent reading level of most students.

Patterned or predictable books are particularly useful for choral reading, because their repetitious style invites students to join in. Begin by reading the book aloud as you model fluent reading.


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Then reread the book and invite students to join in as they recognize the words you are reading. Continue rereading the book, encouraging students to read along as they are able. Students should read the book with you three to five times total though not necessarily on the same day. At this time, students should be able to read the text independently. In tape-assisted reading, students read along in their books as they hear a fluent reader read the book on an audiotape. For tape-assisted reading, you need a book at a student's independent reading level and a tape recording of the book read by a fluent reader at about words per minute.

The tape should not have sound effects or music. For the first reading, the student should follow along with the tape, pointing to each word in her or his book as the reader reads it.


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Next, the student should try to read aloud along with the tape. Reading along with the tape should continue until the student is able to read the book independently, without the support of the tape.

In partner reading, paired students take turns reading aloud to each other. For partner reading, more fluent readers can be paired with less fluent readers.

The stronger reader reads a paragraph or page first, providing a model of fluent reading. Then the less fluent reader reads the same text aloud. The stronger student gives help with word recognition and provides feedback and encouragement to the less fluent partner. The less fluent partner rereads the passage until he or she can read it independently.

Partner reading need not be done with a more and less fluent reader. In another form of partner reading, children who read at the same level are paired to reread a story that they have received instruction on during a teacher-guided part of the lesson. Two readers of equal ability can practice rereading after hearing the teacher read the passage. In readers' theatre, students rehearse and perform a play for peers or others.

Interventions for Students with Writing Disabilities

They read from scripts that have been derived from books that are rich in dialogue. Students play characters who speak lines or a narrator who shares necessary background information. Readers' theatre provides readers with a legitimate reason to reread text and to practice fluency. Readers' theatre also promotes cooperative interaction with peers and makes the reading task appealing. Readers theater is one of my very favorite activities. You can find a whole range of scripts out there on the internet for free. I have also adapted favorite or funny stories on my own to use with groups.

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Decoding & comprehension

Skip to main content. You are here Home. Fluency: Instructional Guidelines and Student Activities. By: Texas Education Agency.

Why is fluency important?

The best strategy for developing reading fluency is to provide your students with many opportunities to read the same passage orally several times. To do this, you should first know what to have your students read. Second, you should know how to have your students read aloud repeatedly. Related Developing Fluent Readers. What Works in Fluency Instruction. In fact, the number of programs that claim to help teach kids to read can get overwhelming. This list is designed with dyslexics in mind, but many of the recommendations would be useful for any struggling reader.

Fully-educated adults have found a couple of these really helpful too.

How To Improve Reading Comprehension For Kids | Oxford Learning

One of the first and highest hurdles all readers have to overcome is learning their phonemes: remembering the sound that a letter or collection of letters represents. For some reason the dyslexic brain takes a lot longer to make that link than the typical brain. For regular readers, strings of letters quickly become like the face of friends whose name they know without thinking about it.


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For dyslexics, those letter groups are more like a distant relative they met a while back, for whose name they have to fish around a bit. The only solution, alas, is repetition. Lots of repetition. Endless Alphabet: This app will let your kid play with letters. As they progress, kids can move up to Endless Reader and Endless Wordplay.

Alphabetics : Smaller kids get to practice their letters in multiple ways with this app. They can speak it, write it, hear it and pick it out of a group of other letters. Feels a little more like a game than Endless Alphabet, so they can be useful at different times. Audiobooks: Martin is a big fan of getting kids using audiobooks early. Learning Ally is a good starting point for the world of audiobooks for the dyslexic.

Some parents resist audiobooks, figuring their kids need all the practice they can get. But Martin encourages parents to look at the bigger picture.

School Help: A Teacher and Tutor Guide to Help the Older Student with Limited Word Reading Fluency School Help: A Teacher and Tutor Guide to Help the Older Student with Limited Word Reading Fluency
School Help: A Teacher and Tutor Guide to Help the Older Student with Limited Word Reading Fluency School Help: A Teacher and Tutor Guide to Help the Older Student with Limited Word Reading Fluency
School Help: A Teacher and Tutor Guide to Help the Older Student with Limited Word Reading Fluency School Help: A Teacher and Tutor Guide to Help the Older Student with Limited Word Reading Fluency
School Help: A Teacher and Tutor Guide to Help the Older Student with Limited Word Reading Fluency School Help: A Teacher and Tutor Guide to Help the Older Student with Limited Word Reading Fluency
School Help: A Teacher and Tutor Guide to Help the Older Student with Limited Word Reading Fluency School Help: A Teacher and Tutor Guide to Help the Older Student with Limited Word Reading Fluency
School Help: A Teacher and Tutor Guide to Help the Older Student with Limited Word Reading Fluency School Help: A Teacher and Tutor Guide to Help the Older Student with Limited Word Reading Fluency
School Help: A Teacher and Tutor Guide to Help the Older Student with Limited Word Reading Fluency School Help: A Teacher and Tutor Guide to Help the Older Student with Limited Word Reading Fluency
School Help: A Teacher and Tutor Guide to Help the Older Student with Limited Word Reading Fluency School Help: A Teacher and Tutor Guide to Help the Older Student with Limited Word Reading Fluency

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